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SPIN II by Katrina Jennifer Bedford

Guests at RMG Exposed, the annual juried photography auction and fundraiser for the Robert McLaughlin Gallery, will walk directly into one of the evening’s works of art:  a large-scale projection installation entitled SPIN, by photographer and Durham College Professor, Katrina Jennifer Bedford. We sat down with Sam Mogelonsky, the RMG’s Manager of Marketing and Communications, to learn more about SPIN.

SPIN was first exhibited in 2012 at Nuit Blanche. How did it come to the attention of the RMG, then become part of RMG Exposed 2015?

Katrina Jennifer Bedford is an artist I have been following for a few years. Her work with photography had always interested me, in particular the SPIN project which was presented at Nuit Blanche Toronto and also at Cambridge Galleries Unsilent Night. This project activates the space in such a dynamic way that when we began considering RMG Exposed 2015, I immediately thought of this project and suggested it as an artist project for the event. Katrina was on board and excited about the possibility of re-staging it at the RMG and the collaboration went from there. We were thrilled to receive support from Durham College, where she teaches in the Digital Photography and Video programs, as well as Ed Video for technical support and Posterjack for the production of the SPIN limited edition print.

What’s the significance of installing SPIN in the lobby of the RMG, rather than in a gallery?

We like to think of the entire RMG building as a whole – the experience begins when you walk up the stairs and isn’t confined to one particular gallery space. As much as I enjoy seeing art presented in the “white cube” gallery space, I am equally thrilled and engaged when art is presented in unexpected places, such as corners, hallways, and in this case, our lobby. Besides, the ironic limestone wall in the lobby space is a perfect canvas for a temporary art installation!

How to you hope visitors will feel, or “take away” from SPIN?

I hope people will be as captivated by the project as I was when I first saw it. The simple action of the disco ball rotating in stop motion is almost hypnotic and certainly visually stunning when presented at such a large scale. Since it’s presented at RMG Exposed, I hope people will recognize the significance of both the analogue and digital in photography and video and be inspired to purchase a photograph during the auction, or one of the limited edition prints of SPIN.  I know I will.

How does SPIN enhance the viewing experience of RMG Exposed? Should it influence how guests look at the photographs in the exhibition?

My hope is that the projection will draw the viewer in form outside and they will be engaged and excited about the event from the moment they walk into the RMG. By changing the lobby through the video, I hope that guests will appreciate the transformative properties of art and consider purchasing one of the great photos up at auction to transform their own living spaces. It may or may not have any bearing on how guests view the photographs in the auction, but certainly will provide an amazing backdrop for visitors to enjoy the event!

Can you tell me about the limited edition of SPIN?   

The RMG is thrilled to be collaborating with Katrina on a limited edition of SPIN. The artist print of the project will be available for $50 in support of the RMG’s community outreach programs. The 8×12″ fine art prints are printed with archival ink on 100% cotton Hahnemïhle photo rag. Prints can be purchased in advance at rmgexposed.ca or during the event. Support of this edition is generously provided by Posterjack.

RMG Exposed will be held at the Robert McLaughlin Gallery (72 Queen Street), on November 14, 2015, from 7 pm to 10 pm.  Tickets are $30.  


 

jen-clrAbout the artist: 

Katrina Jennifer Bedford is a photographer, art educator and cultural advocate. She currently holds the position of Professor at Durham College teaching in the Digital Photography and Video Production programs. Jennifer has worked with notable not-for-profit organizations such as the Art Gallery of Hamilton, Kitchener-Waterloo Art Gallery, Cambridge Libraries and Galleries, Contemporary Art Forum Kitchener Area (CAFKA), Art Gallery of Burlington, and Oakville Galleries. Her photographs have been exhibited in Canada and the United States and her photos have been published in Azure magazine, Border Crossings, Canadian Art online, C Magazine and in numerous Canadian exhibition catalogues. For more information visit kjbedford.ca.

 

This article was originally written for What’s On Oshawa. Please visit http://whatsonoshawa.com/index.php/2015/11/10/behind-the-scenes-with-spin-at-rmg-exposed/

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RMG Exposed Picks from our Director of Finance and Administration Olinda Casimiro

With RMG Exposed coming up this Saturday, our staff are sharing their photo picks for the auction. Check our the selection from our Director of Finance and Administration, Olinda Casimiro. It’s not too late to buy your ticket – we hope to see you at RMG Exposed!

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TimMcGhie – Regent Park

Tim McGhie, Regent Park:
I have always been interested in the “house” and how people make them their “home”. This image captures the tear down of an apartment building in Regent Park, Toronto. The “cookie cutter” formula applied to mass housing offers the occupier slim options on how to make the space their own, here, we have is a glimpse of some painted walls, enough to confirm occupancy. Domestic and landscape architecture have transformed our understanding of parks and buildings, this photograph begs the questions, how does one alter a two dimensional structure environment to provide personalization that allows its occupants to create memories?  Will the replacement multifamily house in the end produce anything that looks, feels and inspires growth in its inhabitants? How do we make use of our living spaces, how do we change them and how do we leave them–after all, our house is a house that is like the life that goes on with it.

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Jessica Thalmann – Scientist

Jessica Thalmann, Scientist:
I found myself drawn to this image over and over again, there is a wonderful sculptural element — as if, it almost wants to fall off the wall. Only after some contemplation, did it reveal to me the “Scientist” in the background. There are layers in this photograph worth exploring, including the choice of rainbow-like colours, the subject includes both of things past and future. The colours and their three dimensional shapes perhaps reveals an insight into the mind as it works through the challenges presented in the era that the Scientist created great leaps of growth….science, silent sound and colour juxtaposed together create evocative emotion that naturally allows for engagement and dialogue when viewing this work.

Carolyn Doucette

Carolyn Doucette – Great North American Landscapes Vol.3 #3

Carolyn Doucette, Great North American Landscapes Vol.3 #3:
This work forces the viewer to challenge the way life has changed and what life may be through intervention. Does a dilemma exist in the world today? The interaction of yesterday as observed in the raw landscape which with human ignorance will die, with tomorrow, does the barcode, which is a language understood by the computer have the ability to replace nature? Although beautiful, the barcode, which is represented by a colourfield negative waterfall, appears foreign. It forces the viewer to ponder the complexities that exist in today’s world –nature vs structured human manipulation. There are connections between human and nature all around us, here, the vastness of nature dominates, I am attracted to the beauty of the human geometric elongated rectangles against natures rugged outdoors. I like it – a lot!