My Communications Placement at the RMG

Heather Bulman is a communications student at Durham College and this winter she completed her placement with the RMG. 

My grandmother loved the arts and exposed me to many forms at an early age. From visiting the Whetung Arts and Crafts Gallery in Curve Lake to the Tom Thompson paintings hanging on the walls of her condo or the great performers of 1930s musical productions. I always believed to have a deep appreciation and understanding of the arts.

Then I began my placement at The Robert McLaughlin Gallery. As the Communications Intern, I am surrounded by individuals who live and breathe a passion for the arts. Through my time at the gallery, I have had the opportunity to attend artist and curator talks, which have given me a whole new level of appreciation for the behind-the-scenes efforts of these creative works. Whether listening to Margaret Rodgers’ interpretation of bystanders in the historic photos from the Thomas Bouckley Collection or imagining Senior Curator, Linda Jansma digging through vaults overseas for hidden Jock MacDonald gems. These stories help the viewer see beyond the medium, into the heart of the creator.

The history of our people, land and culture are captured in these works. They are preserved to inspire, teach or challenge the viewer’s understanding, both at the time of publishing and for generations to come.

I am so grateful for my time at the gallery. Not only has my position allowed me to use the skills I’ve acquired through the Durham College Public Relations program, I’ve gained experiences and relationships I’ll value for a lifetime.

– Heather

Advertisements

National Volunteer Week

It’s National Volunteer Week! #NVW2015

All of The Robert McLaughlin Gallery programs rely heavily on our volunteer program. We at the RMG value the importance of volunteerism and make it a priority to ensure all volunteers have an enriching and satisfying experience as they help to fulfill the needs of the gallery.

We thought it would be fun to share some of the reasons we LOVE our volunteers!

“The enthusiasm of our volunteers reminds me why this is a great place to work.” – Linda Jansma, Senior Curator

“Volunteers bring new ideas and a refreshing energy to everything that they do, I find it very inspiring!” – Megan White, Assistant Curator

“In my time at the RMG I feel I’ve learned just as much from our volunteers as they’ve learned from me.” Norah O’Donnell, Manager of Community and Volunteer Development, Manager of Community and Volunteer

“I love how eager our volunteers are to learn new skills and share their ideas.” – Sam Mogelosnsky, Communications Co-ordinator

“I love volunteering at @theRMG. I’ve learned so much from the passionate people that work here.” – Heather Bulman, Communications Intern

We are so grateful for our volunteers. Without them, we just wouldn’t be as awesome! Interested in volunteering, click here to get involved at the RMG!

Happy volunteering!

 

PS… Hey, did you hear? On 14 May, the RMG will be hosting a Volunteer Youth Leaders Symposium. Are you interested in exploring youth volunteerism in your organization? Register here.

 

Image by Ryan Cleary for snapd Oshawa from RMG Fridays March

 

Meet Heather Bulman: Communications Student

Heather Bulman is a communication student at Durham College and this winter she completes her placement with the RMG. She sat down with Sam Mogelonsky, our Communications Coordinator to discuss her experience at the RMG.

RMG: How did you get involved with volunteering at the RMG?

Heather: I began volunteering at the RMG in the summer of 2014. I knew I was interested in completing my non-profit placement here and decided volunteering would be a good way to get to know everyone beforehand.

RMG: Why were you interested in working in the museum sector?

Heather: I believe it’s important for people to experience culture in their community. By visiting galleries and museums, people can gain a better understanding of Canada’s rich cultural history. 

RMG: What has been the focus of your internship at the gallery?

Heather: My position as the Communications Intern at the RMG has allowed me to expand on my public relations education with real-world experience. I have had the opportunity to work on a variety of tasks but have been focusing my efforts on the upcoming Volunteer Youth Leaders Symposium. I am honoured to help plan and execute an event that highlights the importance of youth volunteerism in Durham Region.

RMG: What is one thing you want to share about the RMG?

Heather: The people. I am blown away by not only the kindness of every individual working in the gallery, but also by their passion for art and culture. They are always eager to share stories about their art experiences, both here at the gallery and abroad. By working alongside the gallery staff, I have become more knowledgeable and invested in Canadian art.

RMG: What is your favourite museum?

Heather: My favourite museum is the Canadian Canoe Museum, located in Peterborough, ON. As an elementary school student in Peterborough, I visited this museum multiple times. This was the first museum that enriched my cultural understanding. I remember hearing the rhythm of the indoor waterfall as I imagined myself portaging across the great Canadian landscape.

RMG: What is your first memory of art?

Heather: Although I remember creating art throughout elementary school, I also remember visiting the Whetung Ojibwa Centre with my mother and grandmother, where I was exposed to Indigenous crafts and fine arts for the first time. I immediately fell in love with the elements of nature and rich colours used in these works. Trips to the Curve Lake Reserve shaped my appreciation of Indigenous art and became a tradition in my family.

Volunteer Youth Leaders Symposium at the RMG

On Thursday 14 May, 2015, the RMG will host a one-day Volunteer Youth Leaders Symposium for volunteer coordinators and administrators in the Durham Region. The day will feature an innovative keynote speaker, panel discussions, workshops and networking opportunities. Register now to get involved!

Keynote Speaker: Michael Prosserman, UNITY Charity, Founder & Executive Director

Michael Prosserman (aka break dancer “Bboy Piecez”) felt the transformative impact of his performance and saw the potential to share this impact with others. He will share the exciting journey of UNITY Charity’s rapid growth and his success in achieving life-changing outcomes for youth. UNITY engages youth 10 to 18 by implementing school and community programs helping youth positively express their stress and develop skills for success. UNITY empowers youth to make better choices as leaders, mentors and positive community role models leading to more productive citizens, safer schools, and healthier communities.

Afternoon Workshops:
Workshop 1: Youth Engagement 101
The Students Commission of Canada, Centre of Excellence for Youth Engagement

Workshop 2: Program Evaluation
Darren O’Donnell, Artistic & Research Director, of Mammalia

Register Now!

Spaces are limited.

We are grateful to the Ontario Trillium Foundation for supporting this symposium.

Vol ‘n’ Tell

Vol ‘n’ Tell is an ongoing series of blog posts written by RMG Volunteers. Raechel Bonomo is an Oshawa native, art enthusiast and second-year Print Journalism student at Durham College.

 

Painters Eleven (P11) began in the fall of 1953 in Oshawa, launching them as Ontario’s first abstract painting group. P11 includes members such as Alexandra Luke, Jock Macdonald and Jack Bush – Luke being the catalyst of the group’s formation. The group held their first exhibit under the name “Painters Eleven” in February 1954 at Roberts Gallery in Toronto, Ontario.

The Robert McLaughlin Gallery has had a long-term relationship with Painters Eleven, which explains why the gallery is the owner of the largest collection of the group’s work. The history of the group is woven into the history of the RMG, creating the symbiotic relationship that is prevalent in work displayed from the gallery’s archives. Oshawa native Alexandra Luke, an advocate for abstract art, brought this style of painting to the city through the South Ontario Art Gallery Circuit. The RMG’s foundation as a gallery began with a focus on collecting, preserving and displaying the group’s work. It is because of Luke’s munificent, extensive donation of the group’s work that allows the RMG to continue its original mandate and introduce new pieces to the public.

In a time where the landscape style of the Group of Seven dominated the Canadian art world, the work from P11 would soon become the new foundation for modern art in Canada. The new installation at the Robert McLaughlin Gallery features work from the collection from every member of the P11 and demonstrates their then breakthrough abstract style, evident in works such as Melville’s Island (1961) from group member Ray Mead.

mead

Ray Mead, Melville’s Island, 1961; oil on canvas; Donated by the Ontario Heritage Foundation, 1988; gift of M. F. Feheley

 

With each new installation, there is a cohesiveness that is present within the collection despite the differences in technique and imagery from the artists. For example, the imagery of Alexandra Luke’s piece Encounter (1959) contrasts the more heavy appearance of Cloud (1962) by William Ronald.

ronald

William Ronald, Cloud, 1962; oil on canvas; Donated by the Ontario Heritage Foundation, 1988, gift of Dr. and Mrs. S. P. Starkman

luke

Alexandra Luke, Encounter, 1959; oil on masonite; Gift of Mr. and Mrs. E. R. S. McLaughlin, 1971

Despite abstract being a lesser of my personal favourites, the work of the P11 evolve the style to encompass traditionalist approaches of painting in their work – creating an appeal to both the classical and modern art enthusiasts.

A new exhibition is installed every eight months and features, fittingly, eleven original paintings from the group that is worth a visit to the Robert McLaughlin Gallery.

 

Raechel Bonomo

Volunteer Blog Writer

Robert McLaughlin Art Gallery

The Robert McLaughlin Gallery receives an Ontario Trillium Foundation Grant

The Robert McLaughlin Gallery receives an Ontario Trillium Foundation Grant

The Ontario Trillium Foundation announced today that The Robert McLaughlin Gallery, located in the heart of Oshawa, received a significant grant that supports the organization’s purpose—a  dedication to sharing, exploring, and engaging with various communities through the continuing story of modern and contemporary Canadian art.

The grant totals $167,100 over 36 months and will support improvements to the gallery including new flooring and signage. The funds also support the growing volunteer program, with specific focus on increasing youth and young adults’ access to arts and cultural programming and volunteerism in Oshawa. Funds are also included to support the popular RMG Fridays program through increased youth participation. RMG Fridays is a monthly all-ages event that includes live music, art talks, gallery tours, openings, and community partnerships.

Andrea Cohen Barrack, CEO of the Ontario Trillium Foundation said,

“The Ontario Trillium Foundation has the unique opportunity to partner with a diverse range of not-for-profits and charities, all of whom are passionate and committed to helping their communities. I am excited to see what this round of grantees will accomplish with our support.”

Gabrielle Peacock, CEO of The Robert McLaughlin Gallery agreed that,

“This grant provides us the support we need to increase youth participation and engagement with arts and culture programming, ultimately helping us to forge valuable long-term relationships in our community while supporting youth volunteerism. We are grateful to the Ontario Trillium Foundation for their support of our initiatives.”

The Ontario Trillium Foundation (OTF) enables Ontarians to work together to enhance the quality of life in their communities. The OTF believes that communities across Ontario are rich in talent, creativity and drive, and their grants stimulate communities to build on these assets.

Read More:

Learn more about the OTF at their website www.otf.ca.
Learn more about RMG Fridays at http://www.rmg.on.ca/RMG-FRIDAYS.php
Learn more about the RMG by watching this video:

The Intern Files: Tara Mazurk

The Intern Files is an ongoing series of blog posts written by RMG Interns. Tara Mazurk is a third-year Arts Management Student at the University of Toronto.

There’s satisfaction in assisting the RMG in endeavors which build the local community, support artistic practice across Canada, and provide a pedagogical forum for learning and engagement. As the Communications and Events Assistant, I’ve had the opportunity to coordinate artists for RMG Exposed 2012 and progress the development of the RMG’s volunteer program.

tararmgexposed

The auction at RMG Exposed 2012

 

With RMG Exposed, I was charged with the task of coordinating incoming submissions, creating a comprehensive database, and acting as a liaison between artists and RMG.  Ultimately, the objective was to create a system which was easily accessible internally, and enhanced communication between parties. I was quick to realize the benefits of this project, both as educational experience and within a broader context.
Currently an undergraduate student in Arts Management, the RMG has been wonderful in giving me a breadth of experience in database management, fundraising and development, and in artistic programming. To coordinate selections for a charitable auction allowed me to realize not only the funding impact for the RMG, but also the indispensable relationship between artist and organization. Those who had submitted work for jury came from various locations across Canada and thus various social, cultural, and educational backgrounds; some selected artists had previously no exhibition experience. This values the placement of emerging artists within an institutional framework, and provides a new forum for discussion, display, and career development.

tararmgexposed2

Guests check out works to be auctioned at RMG Exposed 2012

 

No stranger to the professional development acquired through volunteering, I had approached the RMG with an eagerness to learn and inherent support of their values and initiatives. Of course, it was in my natural interest to outreach to new volunteers and to align administration of the volunteer program with the RMG’s Strategic Plan. My responsibilities included researching the various venues to which we could reach interested participants. As an extension of internal operations, I helped create a volunteer database which is accessible and easily filtered for volunteer interests, availability, and current status. The RMG’s volunteer resources are invaluable; and we are currently enhancing the portfolio to provide methods for internal evaluation. At the core of everything, this provides a fitting experience and inviting atmosphere to those who are crucial in building and engaging our community.

tara

Tara (left) and another volunteer clowning around at RMG Fridays August 2012